Hit enter after type your search item

THE STORY OF A CZECH FROM COFFEE TREE TO COFFEE SHOP

/
/
/
14 Views

Today, it is one of the most consumed beverages in the world with tea; coffee. When you’re sipping coffee at Starbucks or coffee world or any café, sipping coffee in a coffee machine, having a coffee horoscope and even making a coffee mask, we never think about where the coffee is produced, when it’s discovered, under what conditions, how it’s produced.

Although coffee was found in Yemen, mocha region was famous for its coffee, but it was found as a wild plant in Ethiopia before domesticating it. According to a legend told, a goat herder named Kaldi in Kaffa, Ethiopia, realizes that his goats are more mobile and energetic than ever, jumping and jumping and do not want to go home.

Suspecting that it is from the red-core plant in the area where his goats graze, he decides to taste it himself and immediately understands why his goats behave like that. He notices that everything from his tongue to his fingertips is tingling. As a result of the rumors circulating, an imam in Yemen tries to brew this red core. Realizing that the coffee kept him awake for a long time, the imam started using this plant before midnight prayers and soon started giving it to the Sufis next to him.

Because of the effect of the drink, they called the drink “k’hawah”, which means booster in Arabic. The Turks called the drink coffee. From there, the words “coffee” were derived in French and English.

In the thirteenth century, Arab coffee shops spread to Arab cities. Since the drink, known as Islamic wine, did not sleep until late at night, especially the men disrupted the order of the city, music was played until late and movements were made to disturb the order.

The governor of Mecca at the time noticed this situation and closed the coffee shops. But the sultan of Cairo, to which the governor of Mecca is attached, was a coffee buff and ordered to lift the ban in Mecca. This news was carried to its territory by the Muslims who came to the pilgrimage and the legitimacy and popularity of coffee was multiplied.

The beginning of the spread of coffee all over the world began when the Ottomans took Yemen in the sixteenth century. In 1554, two businessmen from Aleppo and Damascus opened their first coffee shop in Istanbul. This place became popular with the distinguished people of Istanbul, poets, those who wanted to spend time. New shops are opening in a row.

Coffeehouses have changed the habits of living in society, and it has become a place where people can gather together and spend time together and something is shared. It also gave everyone the freedom to leave the house at any time.

The number of coffee shops reached thousands in Istanbul. It became a place where immoral conversations about gambling often revolved around and the authority was criticized. Religious scholars and jurists of the time instructed Murat IV to close the coffee shops in the seventeenth century. Murat IV, who toured the coffee shops in a dress, was dissatisfied with the situation and in 1640 closed the coffee shops and imprisoned the owners. However, the ban did not last long, and shortly after that, the coffee shops reopened.

In 1650, the first coffee shop in Europe was opened in Oxford, England, at the initiative of Jacob, a Turkish Jew, when british and Dutch East India Companies, trying to control the coffee trade in the Middle East and India, shipped these goods to England for investment purposes when their stock exploded in their hands with the closure of coffee shops on the orders of the Shah in Iran.

Until the 1680s, coffee was consumed in Turkish style with dark, dairy-free and sugary arak. In 1683, when the Ottomans visited the Great Vienna Defeat, they were forced to withdraw, leaving behind a large amount of loot. One of the spoils was coffee. In Vienna, Capuchin monk Marco d’Aviano took his hardness by mixing coffee with cream and honey. Satisfied with this flavor, viennese people began to call this coffee Capuccino.

In France, coffee became fashionable when the Ottoman envoy arrived at the palace in 1669. The way coffee is served, its presentation, the brightness of porcelain cups have affected French women so much that in a short time it has become common to wear Turkish-style headscarves with coffee, and to sit on carpets and cushions.

In 1689, the first ceremony called La Procope was opened in Paris. He was followed by other geniuses. This culture of genius in Paris has left a deep mark on French culture. These were places where the French intellectual Voltaire and Jean Paul Sartre frequented and spent time.

SPREADING COFFEE AROUND THE WORLD

The rapid increase in coffee consumption in Europe was causing the demand to be unsused. Coffee was only welcomed from the Yemeni port of Mocha, with the beans not allowed to be taken out for cultivation. The export of coffee beans without scalding or roasting was prohibited. But an Indian Muslim who came to the pilgrimage managed to smuggle the core out at the beginning of the seventeenth century and started his cultivation in southern India. Dutch traffickers soon noticed this and mimicked the same situation in Seylan and Java. In 1723, the French sent a spy from the army to bring the coffee from Yemen to Martini, their colony in the Caribbean, and started its cultivation.

The French and Dutch followed the same path as Yemen to protect the coffee seed in their colony and banned live seed output. In 1727, the Portuguese stole this plant from the French Guayana, starting the first coffee cultivation in their colony, Brazil. Brazil had taken the first step towards becoming the largest coffee producer. The coffee trade, which was developing in Brazil, gave rise to a terrible need for roots. The increase in demand in the European market was urging the production of coffee in Brazil. More than forty-five thousand African slaves came every year. Two-thirds of the slaves were boys. When slavery was abolished (1888), there were one and a half million slaves in Brazil. After slavery was abolished, people from all over the world began to flock to Brazil to work.

The Dutch brought coffee to Java in 1707 and had it adopted by the domestic manufacturer. In 1725, demand in Europe reached saturation and prices began to fall. But European companies were not planning to give up their profits. The Dutch East India Company also used its military power to put pressure on local producers, forcibly take their production, and, if necessary, impose quotas. This forced the farmers and led to a revolt. The first anti-globalization war took place. (1810-11 Java War)

Coffee was used in the nineteenth century to benefit more from workers as capitalism rose in Europe. Employees avoided drinking coffee, chocolate, tea to quell their hunger, both cheering them up and suppressing their hunger.

Today, it is one of the most consumed beverages in the world with tea; coffee. When you’re sipping coffee at Starbucks or coffee world or any café, sipping coffee in a coffee machine, having a coffee horoscope and even making a coffee mask, we never think about where the coffee is produced, when it’s discovered, under what conditions, how it’s produced. Here’s the date of the coffee in short.

Although coffee was found in Yemen, mocha region was famous for its coffee, but it was found as a wild plant in Ethiopia before domesticating it. According to a legend told, a goat herder named Kaldi in Kaffa, Ethiopia, realizes that his goats are more mobile and energetic than ever, jumping and jumping and do not want to go home. Suspecting that it is from the red-core plant in the area where his goats graze, he decides to taste it himself and immediately understands why his goats behave like that. He notices that everything from his tongue to his fingertips is tingling. As a result of the rumors circulating, an imam in Yemen tries to brew this red core. Realizing that the coffee kept him awake for a long time, the imam started using this plant before midnight prayers and soon started giving it to the Sufis next to him.

Because of the effect of the drink, they called the drink “k’hawah”, which means booster in Arabic. The Turks called the drink coffee. From there, the French word for coffee and english coffee deriveds edible.

A Brief History of Coffee in the Arab World

In the thirteenth century, Arab coffee shops spread to Arab cities. Since the drink, known as Islamic wine, did not sleep until late at night, especially the men disrupted the order of the city, music was played until late and movements were made to disturb the order. The governor of Mecca at the time noticed this situation and closed the coffee shops. But the sultan of Cairo, to which the governor of Mecca is attached, was a coffee buff and ordered to lift the ban in Mecca. This news was carried to its territory by the Muslims who came to the pilgrimage and the legitimacy and popularity of coffee was multiplied.

Ottoman Influence on the History of Coffee

The beginning of the spread of coffee all over the world began when the Ottomans took Yemen in the sixteenth century. In 1554, two businessmen from Aleppo and Damascus opened their first coffee shop in Istanbul. This place became popular with the distinguished people of Istanbul, poets, those who wanted to spend time. New shops are opening in a row. Coffeehouses have changed the habits of living in society, and it has become a place where people can gather together and spend time together and something is shared. It also gave everyone the freedom to leave the house at any time.

The number of coffee shops reached thousands in Istanbul. It became a place where immoral conversations about gambling often revolved around and the authority was criticized. Religious scholars and jurists of the time instructed Murat IV to close the coffee shops in the seventeenth century. Murat IV, who toured the coffee shops in a dress, was dissatisfied with the situation and in 1640 closed the coffee shops and imprisoned the owners. However, the ban did not last long, and shortly after that, the coffee shops reopened.

In 1650, the first coffee shop in Europe was opened in Oxford, England, at the initiative of Jacob, a Turkish Jew, when british and Dutch East India Companies, trying to control the coffee trade in the Middle East and India, shipped these goods to England for investment purposes when their stock exploded in their hands with the closure of coffee shops on the orders of the Shah in Iran.

Until the 1680s, coffee was consumed in Turkish style with dark, dairy-free and sugary arak. In 1683, when the Ottomans visited the Great Vienna Defeat, they were forced to withdraw, leaving behind a large amount of loot. One of the spoils was coffee. In Vienna, Capuchin monk Marco d’Aviano took his hardness by mixing coffee with cream and honey. Satisfied with this flavor, viennese people began to call this coffee Capuccino.

In France, coffee became fashionable when the Ottoman envoy arrived at the palace in 1669. The way coffee is served, its presentation, the brightness of porcelain cups have affected French women so much that in a short time it has become common to wear Turkish-style headscarves with coffee, and to sit on carpets and cushions. In 1689, the first ceremony called La Procope was opened in Paris. He was followed by other geniuses. This culture of genius in Paris has left a deep mark on French culture. These were places where the French intellectual Voltaire and Jean Paul Sartre frequented and spent time.

Spread of Coffee around the World

The rapid increase in coffee consumption in Europe was causing the demand to be unsused. Coffee was only welcomed from the Yemeni port of Mocha, with the beans not allowed to be taken out for cultivation. The export of coffee beans without scalding or roasting was prohibited. But an Indian Muslim who came to the pilgrimage managed to smuggle the core out at the beginning of the seventeenth century and started his cultivation in southern India. Dutch traffickers soon noticed this and mimicked the same situation in Seylan and Java. In 1723, the French sent a spy from the army to bring the coffee from Yemen to Martini, their colony in the Caribbean, and started its cultivation.

Trade in Coffee in History

The French and Dutch followed the same path as Yemen to protect the coffee seed in their colony and banned live seed output. In 1727, the Portuguese stole this plant from the French Guayana, starting the first coffee cultivation in their colony, Brazil. Brazil had taken the first step towards becoming the largest coffee producer.

The coffee trade, which was developing in Brazil, gave rise to a terrible need for roots. The increase in demand in the European market was urging the production of coffee in Brazil. More than forty-five thousand African slaves came every year. Two-thirds of the slaves were boys. When slavery was abolished (1888), there were one and a half million slaves in Brazil. After slavery was abolished, people from all over the world began to flock to Brazil to work.

The Dutch brought coffee to Java in 1707 and had it adopted by the domestic manufacturer. In 1725, demand in Europe reached saturation and prices began to fall. But European companies were not planning to give up their profits. The Dutch East India Company also used its military power to put pressure on local producers, forcibly take their production, and, if necessary, impose quotas. This forced the farmers and led to a revolt. The first anti-globalization war took place. (1810-11 Java War)

Coffee was used in the nineteenth century to benefit more from workers as capitalism rose in Europe. Employees avoided drinking coffee, chocolate, tea to quell their hunger, both cheering them up and suppressing their hunger.

Coffee Consumption and Its Impact on Society Today

The global coffee market has grown so much today that there are twenty million coffee growers in the world. Bad weather anywhere in the world was making coffee growers in the other region earn more, causing the market to rise or bottom out.

Since the green beans of the coffee are not stored, coffee stock cannot be made, which cannot prevent the fluctuation in prices. Brazil called for a solution to the problem in 1938, and Nestle said it had found a method that could be used by freezing and powdering the pulled coffee, adding hot water whenever it wanted.

Coffee consumption per capita is decreasing day by day. This leads to lower coffee prices and surplus production.

In 2002, the World Bank announced that 600,000 people were unemployed in Central America due to reduced production and halting production on coffee farms. The world’s largest coffee processing companies have managed to inflate their profits despite falling prices. They reflected more than 80 percent of falling prices to the manufacturer.

In response to this pattern of exploitation, various NGOs in Europe have proposed to issue certificates to large coffee processor companies through the International Fair Competition Labeling Agency they have established if they commit not to go below the base price set. In America, global exchange is also fighting for fair competition.

The pressures have been successful on Starbucks and Procter Gamble, and they have agreed to buy fair competition certified coffee. However, despite all these successes, the crisis caused by overproduction could not be prevented. Governments fail to attract producers to other areas. Peru and Colombia have been partially successful in this regard, with the manufacturer turning to drug and cocoa cultivation.

With the establishment of Starbucks in 1971, it quickly grew in popularity, reaching ten thousand cafes around the world and becoming a symbol of being cool among young people. Starbucks has started providing wireless internet service to target more customers, trying to provide an experience that makes people feel in their own workplace. With great success, Starbucks has opened a new lifestyle to its customers.

Having started his journey in Ethiopia, breathing in Yemen and spreading from there to the world, coffee is now continuing his journey with our state-of-the-art tools.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.

This div height required for enabling the sticky sidebar